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20130117
20130125
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
beginning for him because the first time around, he was elected based on what he promised to do. and this time around, he feels he was elected on what he has done and what he can do in the years to come. and there, you're looking, again, at the president's church. and, george, i wonder what you were thinking this morning when you woke up, about this day because it is a day that gives a president we know a chance to start again, for the country. >> everything stops. everything is new for at least a moment. and he has that clear shot to speak to the entire country. and it feels like the one day where the entire country has ears to hear what the president has to say, as well. >> and one we can show the world also listening. we can show the world that after a hard-fought election, a bruising time in congress, that we are still together in this country. and i believe we have jon karl, white house correspondent, with us. he is also there on the west side of the capitol. jon? >> reporter: diane, i'm here. the divisions, the president will be surrounded, of course, by family and friends
. the challenge to us is to remember what we learned when we first entered this movement, that you never elect someone to make change happen for you. you elect somebody to make it a little easier for your movement to keep on making change after. and so, brothers and sisters, i implore you tonight, have a good time, party caressed well, then get right back on the battlefield tuesday morning because we took our democracy back and we ain't giving it up to nobody. thank you and god bless. fire it up. fire it up. fire it up! god bless you all. >> that was president of the naacp, benjamin jealous, speaking at the peace ball, voices of hope and resistance come here in washington, d.c. on sunday night. we will be back with more from the peace ball couldn't angela davis, sonia sanchez and others in a moment. ♪ [music break] >> sweet honey in the rock performing at the peace ball last night. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. we are broadcasting from washington, d.c., bringing you special coverage of today's inauguration as hundreds of thousands gath
to go against me for re-election. you are going to go against me on the vietnam war. >> guest: yes. king now i understand what courage it took to take the stand that he did and i understand more about why he hesitated. faretta was very much involved in the antiwar movement from an early stage but again she was not the public figure so he could send her essentially to speak for him. >> host: again he proved dr. king right. >> guest: i think so. this was one of the ways -- i think he's a visionary. i think he understood the connection between the anti-colonial movements going on around the world and understood how the cold war had prevented us from seeing -- we were on the wrong side, that because the communist movement had identified itself with anti-colonialism many of these nationalists wanted to have the assistance of the soviet union so we saw it in cold war terms. >> host: my enemy's enemy is my friend. you left the country during the vietnam era. why? >> guest: well, for me looking back it wasn't that difficult a choice because i knew i wasn't going to go into the military. >> host:
changes be made? >> i actually don't think so. when you look at the democrats up for re-election in the senate, many are from southern states, pro-gun states. there's very little common ground when you're dealing with the right in the constitution. >> this is the problem here when you put politics in it, you have too many people worried about getting re-elected as opposed to worrying about the 10,000-plus folks killed every year when it comes to gun violence. they should put lives ahead of their jobs. >> let me share another quote. "time" magazine/orc poll shows that 56% support a ban on semiautomatic weapons. that is down from 62% in december. if a poll was taken right now, what do you think -- what do you think that would be? >> oh, you know, i would be very interested to see it because of how you shape it. it's fascinating. we did a thing from our radio show, talking to people and showing pictures. they said, yeah, ban that gun. it was a shotgun, it just had a pistol grip. people didn't understand. the problem with the assault weapons ban has always been it's a spooky looking
. the latino vote but it was decisive in the last election. when, each of these groups that played a role, that's why in my view when i came here for the inauguration i said the day before the inauguration i give a speech and i said the important day is not tomorrow. we celebrate that. the important days the day after tomorrow. what are we going to do then and for a lot of people they went home and celebrated. >> host: it is a milestone. i never thought i would see a black president. so it is to be we've talked a great deal about the movement and very little about you but i think we are getting to know you're here in your comments. you ended dr. king's papers. there are several peepers in boston university. how are the papers that you edited -- >> guest: they're all very different. the papers line editing, the papers at boston, the papers in atlanta, the papers and so many different places, hundreds of archives around the world. i found papers in india. we bring them all together and decide how to publish them and make them available to people. that's been my job for the last 25 years. >> host:
was elected president and called and said congratulations for your pulitzer in history. i would love to talk to you about how to preserve historical materials and what you've noticed from the presidential libraries you for tin. and on that basis we have talked a good bit while he's been president to renew our acquaintance ship after a 20 year hiatus. c-span: have you had any discussions with him about his whole race initiative? >> guest: absolutely. yes, i have. c-span: what do you recommend to him? >> guest: i think this is a great thing. i personally think from the work that i've done that our racial dialogue in america, our discourse is far behind hour objective reality and where we are; that if you study this period and you see how parochial, how limited, how much violence, how on a custom a lot of white people were even meeting simply from a different denomination or a different section of the country, there's -- ads in the newspaper were divided not only by race, but by sex; "help wanted, female," and jobs were -- you know, for women, were secretaries and teachers. we left it up a whol
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)